Welcome to our awareness page as a melanoma patient I understand the importance of awareness ,  About 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers and 65 percent of melanoma cases are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) Rays.

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What do you know about moles?

Moles, while many of us have them, not many people actually know what they are, or are aware of the different types that exist.

Scientifically known as melanocytic naevi (singular nevus), moles are spots that form on the skin and are clusters made up of left-over melanocytes.

Moles are usually brown or flesh coloured, can be flat or raised, and some may even have hair growing in them.

Some moles change with time, either growing in number or changing colour, in accordance with fluctuating hormones, while others are present from birth.

For example, some moles darken during pregnancy, and some moles begin to appear during puberty. Others darken in correlation to sun exposure over long periods of time.

Some moles may even fade with old age after age 50 or even earlier.

There is a large variety of moles, categorised into different types, however the most common are : junctional, dermal, and compound. Junctional moles are mostly flat, round, and brown in colour. Dermal moles are usually raised, can include hair, and are pale in colour. Compound moles are somewhat of a combination between dermal and junctional, as they can be hairy, raised, and brown in colour. The type of moles that appear at birth

Dermal moles are usually raised, can include hair, and are pale in colour. Compound moles are somewhat of a combination between dermal and junctional, as they can be hairy, raised, and brown in colour. The type of moles that appear at birth are known as congenital naevi.

Most moles are not cancerous, however it is important to monitor any and all changes that occur to your moles. Moles that change shape or border, are itchy/bleeding, or change colour, should be recorded and brought to the immediate attention of a doctor or dermatologist. Your doctor may recommend a removal or biopsy of the mole, which may very well save your life, as some moles can develop into Melanoma.

Moles that change shape or border, are itchy/bleeding, or change colour, should be recorded and brought to the immediate attention of a doctor or dermatologist. Your doctor may recommend a removal or biopsy of the mole, which may very well save your life, as some moles can develop into Melanoma.

Your doctor may recommend a removal or biopsy of the mole, which may very well save your life, as some moles can develop into Melanoma.


 Sunbeds are not safe – FACT!

sunbed use

The World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classified radiation, from both the sun and artificial UV tanning devices as carcinogenic to humans. However, the intensity of UV rays in some sunbeds can be more than 10 times stronger than the midday Mediterranean sun!

However, the intensity of UV rays in some sunbeds can be more than 10 times stronger than the midday Mediterranean sun!

However, the intensity of UV rays in some sunbeds can be more than 10 times stronger than the midday Mediterranean sun!

Using sunbeds for the first time before the age of 35 increases the risk of developing melanoma skin cancer by 59%. Regular sunbed use under the age of 30 increases the risk of skin cancer by an alarming 75%!

Short, intense and irregular UV exposure, like you, receive from sunbed use is the fastest way to damage your skin. Damage increases with each session is irreparable and can lead to melanoma – one of the biggest cancer killers in 15-34-year-olds in the UK!


The national GP referral guidelines.

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